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The worlds largest open-air urban art museum Titanes champions social inclusion

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Titanes, the world's largest urban art museum, collates artwork from 14 street artists and 450 people with disabilities. Unveiled on the 1st April 2019 in the Spanish city of Ciudad Real, the project promotes social inclusion through art and a large open-air museum.

Titanes consists of six disused silos, which have now been converted into six giant, brightly-coloured murals, forever transforming the semiarid landscape and emblematic buildings of La Mancha.

Image courtesy of Antonio Rivera and Elchino Po

The project brought together artist Okuda San Miguel’s creative team, Ink and Movement, a Spanish disabilities rights association, Laborvalía, and the Provincial Council of Ciudad Real.

“This is a cross-cutting project that manages to unite social inclusion, the commitment to urban art and the recovery of our rural heritage. The province is now an open-air museum in which our towns are part of the works. The people with disabilities who have taken part of the project are our true 'titans'," says José Manuel Caballero Serrano, President of the Provincial Council of Ciudad Real.

The aim of Titanes is to promote the successful integration of disabled individuals in society and the workplace through a collaborative project.

Through the initiative, 450 individuals with disabilities from Laborvalía associations have been able to support 14 well-renowned urban artists, who were invited to make the project a reality by Okuda San Miguel.

Okuda, who is famed internationally for his distinctive geometric art, describes the project’s aim to be “to change, through art, society's image of people with disabilities".

In a video posted by Ink and Movement, Alfonso Gutiérrez of Laborvalía says that the project also values the talents of people with disabilities, people whose talents had not previously been seen.

Okuda talks about how the project eliminates ideological, religious and language barriers.

He shared an image of his renovated silo in Calzada de Calatrava on Instagram.

View this post on Instagram

@iamtitanes festival @asociacion_laborvalia @inkandmovement @diputacioncr +++

A post shared by OKUDA SAN MIGUEL (@okudart) on

Hell’O also share a photograph of their masterpiece in Malagón, which they describe as having an “optimistic, pop and fresh touch".

Here, Bilicleta Sim Freio can be seen working on their mural, called “Os Gigantes de la Mancha”.

The artists' works are only the start of an exciting artistic movement in the Spanish region.

Details of the next artistic interventions, which will permanently alter the La Mancha landscape, are soon to be confirmed.

See more pictures and updates from the project on the website or on their Instagram @iamtitanes.

Lead mage courtesy of Antonio Rivera and Elchino Po




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