Media Partners | Contributors | Advertise | Contact | Log in | Tuesday 21 May 2019
182,513 SUBSCRIBERS

This week in Tech: Mind reading and an unlimited Phone Battery

RATE THIS ARTICLE

Share This Article:

Last week was an exciting week in tech, as we explored the VR sequel to Groundhog Day, software that will help people learn sign language themselves, the potential to have unlimited battery life on your phone, and giving people who can not speak a voice.

Gaming

A VR game will be released later this year as a sequel to the film Groundhog Day. Sony Pictures Virtual Reality, MWM Immersive and Tequila Works have entitled it Groundhog Day: Like Father Like Son. The protagonist, Phil Connors Junior, will have to repeat the day again and again "until he learns the true value of friends and family". It will be available on PlayStation VR, Oculus and Vive.

Image Credit: bruce mars on Pexels

Artificial Intelligence

Stephanie Stoll, a PhD student at the University of Surrey, is working with colleagues to develop software to help people teach themselves sign languages. Users watch a video of the sign language movement. Then, their movements in response are recorded and analysed to give feedback. The software teaches Swiss-German sign language, with the hopes to expand into other languages in the future.

Image Credit: Seanbatty on Pixabay

Mobile phones

ChargedUp, a start-up in London, has set up around 250 charging stations at bars, restaurants, cafes and offices across the city. People can borrow a portable charger, take it away and return it to any ChargedUp Station when they have finished using it. An app will allow users to pay for the service. 

The Future of Mind-reading

Researchers from Columbia University, New York have constructed understandable speech using computer processed brain activity. Five epilepsy patients had an electrode placed on their brain to listen to the electrical activity as the individuals listened to sets of word sequences. Artificial Intelligence then produced audio, with a voice relaying the numbers zero to nine. In the future, it is hoped that this technology could give people who cannot speak a voice.

Image Credit: Pixabay

You are now up to date with all things technology based - come back next week for the latest roundup and see more tech here.




© 2019 TheNationalStudent.com is a website of BigChoice Group Limited | 201 Borough High Street, London, SE1 1JA | registered in England No 6842641 VAT # 971692974