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This week in Tech: digital music composition and AI translators

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In this week's round-up we discuss a gaming app that can help to detect concussions and AI that can compose new music.

Smartphones

Nintendo logo

Shuntaro Furukawa, Nintendo’s CEO, has announced his aim to expand into the market of smartphone games.

The company plans to issue two or three new games per year. Nintendo’s Pokémon Go, which was released in July 2016, was the second-fastest selling mobile game ever.

 

Gaming

Gaming could soon help individuals to recognise when they have a concussion.

Dr Sanjeev Sharma’s app, EQ- Active Brain Tracking, contains games to test the user’s reaction times and memory, providing a baseline to recognise any drop in performance, which may signal a concussion. 

Concussions are notoriously difficult to self-diagnose meaning a game with a facility like this could be hugely useful. 

 

AI

Baidu logo

Baidu has released a device powered by artificial intelligence that can almost instantaneously translate speech from English into Chinese or German. This competes with Google Translate, that can translate speech in real time through ‘Google Pixel buds’.

The AI was fed two million pairs of English and Chinese sentences in order to learn how to translate rapidly.

 

The future of music composition

music notes

CJ Carr and Zach Zukowski have designed SampleRNN, a software designed to create new audio based on sounds it is given.

This provides the potential to generate a new song with some data inputs. AI has previously been utilised by musicians, David Cope developed ‘Emi’ in 1980, a computer that could analyse a piece of composition and create an entirely new song.




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