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TV Review: Colony (Season 2, Episode 8)

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As we head for the final episodes of this season, ‘Good Intentions’ is an hour that keeps viewers on the edge of their seats, holding their breath in anticipation.

One after the other, each Bowman faces life-threatening peril in a series of blood-pumping scenarios, which serves to make the audience all the more grateful come this week’s resolution.

Firstly, the Home Office has identified the man whom Will let escape from the Red Hand’s hideout, Emmett, and are now devoting all resources to finding and capturing him alive.

This once again puts one of the Bowmans at risk, because if the man is to be captured he will undoubtedly give up Will during interrogations. Even as Katie, with Broussard’s help, tries to get to Emmett before he is captured, his reckless behaviour means the Redhats are successful in capturing him.

Although he does not give up how he escaped the raid in the first round of interrogations, there is still potential for him to reveal that Will helped him, which would likely be the last shove for Will to fall down the precipice.

In his investigation, Will is faced with Frankie’s grieving mother, and by extension a version of who he was before he got Charlie back. Yet the empathy isn’t overwhelming, but rather awkward, as we can’t help but notice his suit and clean-shaven appearance sets him far apart from the distraught woman opposite him. It’s haunting to see how far Will has been pushed from his old self, one whose morals were far more static than they are forced to be now.

The exact sentiment is expressed by Snyder, when Bram indicts him for the deaths of his fellow campmates, and working for the Raps: “So does your father. So does everyone who’s holding out hope that someday, things will be different”. Snyder has always been one of the more complex and interesting characters of Colony, and this is just one instant demonstrating it.

If there’s one lesson Colony emphasises in this new world, it’s that survival depends on grey areas. Placing both feet firmly in one camp, white or black, is only an invitation for a swift death.

‘Good Intentions’ is also Bram’s breaking point. His simple ideals and view of the world have thus far brought him to act recklessly, and his survival is only thanks to external forces looking out for his wellbeing.

Yet, this week he is forced to face that he is the one responsible for many people’s deaths, both members of the Resistance within the labour camp, and innocents who were serving their time, and this breaks him.

He only makes it out of the camp alive and relatively consequence-free, before it is bombed by the Raps as revenge for the explosion of their shipment, thanks to Snyder’s loyalty to Will.

After witnessing how naïve Bram has been, and how blindly he’s being throwing himself into situations, this might be the wakeup call he needs in order to start prioritising his own survival and just be smarter about things in general.

Meanwhile, Katie, having jumped back into the deep end of the Resistance movement, is very nearly caught by the Redhats when she and Emmett find themselves ambushed. In a scene during which disbelief has to be suspended, she hides in a closet as the agents search the place top to bottom, but do not find her. It’s a very sudden reminder that our heroes are very much at risk and that any one wrong move might be the last they make.

Lastly, the moment of peril that strikes Charlie and Gracie within their own home leads to one of the most compelling scenes in Colony, a long take in which the camera follows Will and Katie as they make their way through their house, knocking down attackers one by one.

Charlie’s time on the streets comes in handy as he is able to hear the intruders before they break into the house, getting Gracie out of harm’s way before Lindsey is violently gunned down.

Against all odds, and after each of the Bowmans individually facing their own moment of great danger, the family is finally, and for the first time, reunited in its entirety.

It’s a moving and beautiful moment that closes an episode of prolonged anxiety. And though developments suggest that this peace will not last for long, we nonetheless bathe in the Bowmans’ momentary happiness.

After spending the past few episodes digesting and developing all of Colony’s major storylines, ‘Good Intentions’ strikes back with a distressing and beautiful instalment, full of twists and turns that tell a tale that is both bleak and poignant. 




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