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10 nu-metal bangers we need to bring back

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Remember nu-metal?

Linkin Park

The angst-ridden genre that came screaming and shouting its way into mainstream culture like a freight train (Limp Bizkit reference fully acknowledged and intended) and made us all want to stomp around in an Adidas tracksuit?

No?

Well, spike your hair up, put the chains back on your jeans and punch a hole through your bedroom wall for absolutely no reason. We’re taking a trip down memory lane.

And it’s about to get angry.

Korn (or KoЯn, if you will) – 'Freak On A Leash'

Distorted, gurgling guitars, paired with horrifying, guttural screaming and a suitably disturbing video – 1998’s ‘Freak On A Leash’ was pure, fucked up nu-metal chaos at its best.

36 Crazyfists - 'Slit Wrist Theory' 

On the more melodic end of the nu-metal spectrum were 36 Crazyfists, who materialized from literally nowhere with 2002’s hit ‘Slit Wrist Theory’. Vocalist Brock Lindow had possibly one of the most unusual voices in the whole genre, meandering his way round an impressive vocal range during the verses and screaming the place down on the choruses.  

Limp Bizkit - 'Break Stuff'

Had a bad day? ‘Break Stuff’ was the answer to all of your problems. You could always count on Fred Durst’s poetic and insightful lyrics to set everything to rights: “Your best bet is to stay away motherfucker / It’s just one of those days.”

Inspiring.

P.O.D. - 'Alive'

Nu-metal wasn’t all about wanting to punch the shit out of things or slam your head repeatedly against a wall. Sometimes bands liked to yell about feeling tip top, too. PMA, man. PMA.  

Kittie - 'Brackish'

Yes, yes – there really were such things as all-female nu-metal bands. And these Canadian ladies were absolutely slaying it. 2000’s ‘Brackish’, with its menacing riffs, relentless drumming and furious scream-rapping, is a case in point.

Evanescence - 'Bring Me To Life'

Here was a 21-year-old Amy Lee also proving that you didn’t have to be an angry bloke to make it in the world of nu-metal, with 2003’s unforgettable ‘Bring Me To Life’.

And no, that isn’t Mike Shinoda from Linkin Park doing the guest vocal, despite what everybody seems to think. It’s actually front-man Paul McCoy from 12 Stones. (Evidently his appearance on this track did wonders for his own band…)

Incubus - 'A Certain Shade of Green' 

While Incubus certainly don’t belong in the same league as the likes of Limp Bizkit, there was a time – a long time ago – when they could have been classed as nu-metal. ‘A Certain Shade of Green’, taken from their second album S.C.I.E.N.C.E (1997), is a stellar example of the band’s unique blend of funk, hip-hop and hard rock, and is probably one of the most underrated nu-metal songs of all time.

Papa Roach - Last Resort

“CUT MY LIFE INTO PIECES / THIS IS MY LAST RESORT”

Was there ever a better opening line in the entire history of nu-metal? No. Absolutely not.

‘Last Resort’ catapulted P-Roach into mainstream success, charting at Number 1 on the US Modern Rock Tracks Chart and Number 3 on the UK Singles Chart.

Deftones - My Own Summer (Shove It)

Can we all just stop for a minute and talk about that riff? And those blood-curdling screams? And that snare tone? And just this entire song in general?

Yes, Deftones. Yes.

Linkin Park - One Step Closer

Last but certainly not least is Linkin Park, with the colossal hit ‘One Step Closer’. It was raw, heavy, and aggressive, but it was catchy as hell. Cue 2000's Hybrid Theory becoming the biggest selling debut album of the 21st Century, and cue Linkin Park becoming, arguably, the kings of nu-metal.

(On another note, just why is Chester Bennington screaming that famous refrain whilst upside down on the ceiling? And what’s with all the floating ninjas? And the fire? This we will never know).




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