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What People Believe: Nuwaubian Nation

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Nuwaubianism might not be as widely known (and ridiculed) as Scientology or as infamous as the Manson family, but in the grand scheme of belief systems, it's a pretty strange one.

Although now virtually extinct, when it was active the Nuwaubian movement was one of the most bizarre personality cults around.

Founded by black supremacist Malachi (Dwight) York, the group described themselves as a fraternity, although they draw heavily on various religions and philosophies. York was an enigmatic leader who in 2004 was convicted for child molestation on a grand scale.

Inconsistent and ever-changing in its central beliefs, the first incarnation of the Nuwaubian movement was a black-muslim organisation, with York at its helm. In a matter of years the quasi-muslim movement which had also incorporated elements of Freemasonry and several other niche religious dogmas had re-invented itself as part of the Black Hebrews movement.

Claiming to be the only authentic descendents of the Hebrews, the Nuwaubians also dabbled in the other branches of abrahamic religion, Christianity and Islam.

In the mid 90s the group moved away from traditional established religious beliefs and began to bring more Native American, New Age and Ancient Egyptian strands into their organisation. Their eccentric beliefs have changed at a rapid rate since the group's inception, with leader Dwight Yorke publishing over 450 'scrolls' or booklets about the various tacks it has taken under several pen-names.

The group, whose followers numbered up to 3,000 in the 1970s, decided in the 1990s to build their own headquarters. 'Tama-Re' was a complex in Georgia and changing their narrative once more, the group styled themselves as Native Americans, using cod-science to explain the existence of black people in the USA "before contnental drift."

Styled on Ancient Egypt, Tama-Re was an impressive complex in Georgia which acted as the headquarters for York's followers. Although it was knocked down after York's incarceration, the impressive compound featured pyramids, sphynx and obelisks in tribute to some of the group's wackier inspirations.

What they believe:

- Black supremacy. York is quoted as having said: “White people are the devil. They say the Nuwaubians are not racist – bullcrap! I am. He might not be; that’s his prerogative. I am.”

- White people were created as a race of killers to serve black people, in a plan which backfired.

- Nubians were originally green, but their skin "rusted" to brown in the earth's atmosphere.

- The 'rapture' of the Christian Bible actually refers to Raptors. Raptors who will return to earth and eat people.

- Dwight York is a master-teacher from the planet Rizq.

- Extra-terrestrials have been trading with the US Government for inventions such as the polio vaccine. And hula-hoops.

- The Earth is hollow and populated by different species of people, such as the Deros, the Teros, the Flugelrods, the Duwanis, the Dunakial, and the Anunnaqi, who live in underground cities.




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