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Captain Marvel review - a feminist epic that will go down in history

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Verdict: A timely feminist epic, which shows what we all already knew... women are strong as hell.

It’s the most talked about film of the year so far, and the sheer idea of a female superhero caused so much uproar that Rotten Tomatoes had to disable the review feature so that people stopped giving negative reviews before they’d actually watched the film. 

Set in 1995, Captain Marvel follows Carol ‘Vers’ Danvers, played by the exceptional Brie Larson. Vers (pronounced ‘Veers’) is a member of Starforce, living on the planet Hala – the home of the Kree.

Image Credit: Marvel Studios courtesy of Organic Marketing

 

 

Along with her fellow Starforce members, led by Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), Vers has been sent on a mission to stop the Skrulls (alien shape shifting type creatures). However, when this mission does quite go as planned, Vers ends landing in Los Angeles, on planet Earth, where she meets S.H.I.E.L.D agent Nick Fury (Samuel L Jackson).

 

Back in Hala, Vers was having reoccurring nightmares which Yon-Rogg dismisses as saying she can’t keep her emotions in check. However, when she arrives on Earth, Vers realises that these nightmares were memories, and that she has no idea who she really is.

 

Image Credit: Marvel Studios courtesy of Organic Marketing

Cue a search for her ‘true’ self, which leads to the discovery of an adorable ginger cat called Goose (a nod to Top Gun), a former best friend (Lashana Lynch) and her child (Akira Akbah) and a really excellent taste in aviator sunglasses.

 

Being set in the ‘90s, the attention to detail is sublime. From the Blockbuster store which is equipped with hundreds of VHS tapes which are completely periodically accurate, to a soundtrack that encompasses everything from Nirvana to TLC – Captain Marvel serves up a big slice of nostalgia. The details don’t stop there; the character of Nick Fury has been digitally de-aged by 25 years, to fit with the time period.

 

Just to get this out the way... I’m not a Marvel fan. I’ve never been into superhero films, they’ve always seemed like a bit of a boy’s club to me. Lots of angry men in suits fighting each other to save the world, with the occasional appearance of a woman in a leather catsuit and thigh high heeled boots. Growing up I assumed that superheroes weren’t for me because they were all men. The only female superhero I’d ever seen was Wonder Woman, who manages to save the planet whilst maintaining a bouncy blow-dry and a perfectly groomed face.

Image Credit: Marvel Studios courtesy of Organic Marketing

To see a superhero who looked like me (well relatively speaking – I’m not claiming to look like Brie Larson) would have meant everything to me as a child. She’s a blonde female character who isn’t stupid or sexualised. Her best friend is a black single mother, who is strong and capable, an airforce pilot and all round bad-ass female character. Every woman in the film is a person in her own right, there are no love interests – in fact the only love story in the film is the age-old tale of female friendship.


The first ever female (this is not a joke) led Marvel film was something that grabbed my attention from the moment I first saw the trailer. The female experience is a huge part of the film, growing up Carol was always told she wasn’t good enough, or strong enough, or that she’s ‘too emotional’. It rings true for the women who have been told to ‘cheer up’ or to ‘smile more’. 

Image Credit: Marvel Studios courtesy of Organic Marketing

There’s a fight scene towards the end of the film which is set to No Doubt’s 90s smash hit ‘Just A Girl’. Now for any men watching it’s probably just a normal fight scene... no big deal. That scene was for all the little girls who were told they ‘fight like a girl’, all the young women who were told to ‘man up’ and to control their emotions. Captain Marvel teaches a whole generation of young people that it’s ok to fight like a girl - because girls are strong as hell.

 

Captain Marvel is in cinemas now.

Lead Image Credit: Marvel Studios courtesy of Organic Marketing




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