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How Huda Kattan taught me to embrace my inner weirdness

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“If you ask me, the only people who enjoy happiness and success embrace their weirdness” - Huda Kattan

via GIPHY

If you’re a follower of Huda Beauty on social media, you’ve probably seen the outlandish content that the account shares.

Braided brows, Vagisil as primer and Bird Poo facials are just a few of the questionable ‘hacks’ that have been tested on the blog. And at this year’s Business of Fashion Voices event, Huda Kattan herself took to the stage to discuss the importance of staying true to yourself and how learning to embrace her weirdness got her where she is today.

Huda Beauty is one of the industry’s leading cosmetics brands, but it appears Huda’s success comes from finally ‘finding her genius’ after years of fighting against her true self to appear ‘normal’. 

Whether you're a huge fan of her blog and products, or not even into beauty at all, there’s a lot to be learned from her speech. In a world where image (particularly on social media) is everything, there’s a lot of pressure to feel like you ‘fit in’ - but who’s to say that just because something isn’t exactly the norm means that it’s not cool?

Don’t get me wrong, as someone who studies the fashion and beauty industries daily, I fully understand the importance of trends. However, blindly going with what is ‘cool’ or ‘socially acceptable’ every single day essentially leads to a lack of individuality and a constant feeling of losing your real self.

Huda’s story began in school at the age of seven, when a fellow classmate straight up said to her face “Huda… you’re weird.” This, along with feeling like an outcast (Huda refers to coming from a family of Muslim immigrants, being dark, and having a huge personality with an obsession for the arts as reasons why she knew she was different) led to Huda essentially forcing herself to be anyone but her true self.

Being somewhat of an odd child myself, I can fully relate to every word of her story. My first year at secondary school saw me earn the nickname ‘Green Giant’ - I was considerably taller than even some of the final year students and I thought it’d be cool to dye my hair green - something my classmates absolutely did not agree with. By my final year, however, I was unrecognisable. So much so, that I remember a girl turning to me and asking “hey, do you remember that freak who had green hair when we first started?”

Although I should've probably taken offence, I took the fact that she had no idea that it was me as a sign that I’d successfully distanced myself from the ‘weird’ persona I once had.

The thing is, finally being accepted didn’t lead to success or happiness. Constantly battling with yourself to be someone who society deems as ‘normal’ is quite frankly exhausting. For Huda, it wasn’t until her first job after college that she came to this realisation. She claims she was fired because she ‘didn’t fit the part’, leading to an identity crisis where she realised that she had to accept her true self for who she was. She proudly told the audience “I had no choice but to accept who I was. I wanted to be fully me, totally and utterly weird…. Being different challenges norms, but different is brilliant”.

A particular stand out moment for me was when Huda spoke about raising her daughter to truly accept herself right from the start, noting that if someone calls her weird, she replies ‘thank you’. Since watching this I’ve found it so much easier to accept who I am, purely by changing my perception of ‘weird’ entirely. Weird is not bad; weird is a compliment. A world where everyone conforms can only result in a world where nothing ever changes. We need weirdos just like Huda to push boundaries and make changes.

If I could give one piece of advice to anyone, it would be to watch this video and learn to embrace your inner weirdness - there’s a whole world out there, and you’ll never make your mark by being ordinary.

via GIPHY

Visit Huda Beauty here

Lead image credit: Tiago Chediak 




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