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This Week in Tech: Moon exploration and 'touchless' technology

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Last week was an exciting week in tech, as we explored China’s advancement in moon exploration, funding for Verily’s projects with the potential to improve people’s quality of life, and more. 

Artificial Intelligence

The Finnish government and over 250 companies are supporting the one percent AI project to teach the population about the basics and provide them with improved computing skills. The course initially aimed for at least one percent of the nation to be trained in AI, with hopes for it to expand in the future. This can help individuals apply AI solutions to their daily work.

 

Image credit: Seanbatty on Pixabay

Healthcare advancements 

Verily, an arm of Alphabet, has raised $1 billion from private investors to expand their work on projects to collect health data that might predict and prevent illnesses. Their previous initiatives include the Smart lens project -  contact lenses containing small circuits to help people with farsightedness and the development of miniaturised continuous glucose monitors to aid those with Type Two Diabetes.

Image credit: TheDigitalArtist on Pixabay

Gesture-controlled technology

Google’s Project Soli was approved for further development by the Federal Communications Commission in Washington D.C. last week. Soli is a sensor that can detect subtle hand movements using radar. This has the potential to change the way we interact with technology, you could alter the volume or draw on a tablet using hand gestures rather than actually touching a screen.

 

Future of Space Exploration

Last week, China announced that the Chang'e-4 probe had landed on the previously unexplored far side of the Moon. The robotic spacecraft landed on 3rd January, and signals to and from it are transmitted through the Queqiao satellite - which can send information to Earth. Now the Chang’e-4 will complete geological experiments to discover more about the Moon’s hidden side.Diagram of Chang-'e 4

Image credit: Loren Roberts for The Planetary Society // Wikimedia Commons

You are now up to date with all things technology based - come back next week for the latest roundup and see more tech here

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