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Interview: Hannah Witton on sex and breaking stigmas

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We spoke with Hannah Witton, Sex & Relationships Vlogger & Author, to find out more about her YouTube channel and what's in her future.

If you haven't heard of Hannah Witton before, you might have been living under a rock.

Funny, bright and utterly unafraid, she's willing to tackle anything with a smile on her channel. Sex? Yep. Contraception? She's done it. Period products? Obviously. Trust us, her video on menstrual cups is a comedic (and informative) delight you didn't know you needed.

Recently, she's even opened up about her stoma surgery and what it's like to live with a stoma bag. Both brave and important, making videos on this topic has allowed her to educate people about what a stoma actually is, why you might need to have stoma surgery and what recovery is like.

While others might shy away from sharing such personal information, Hannah embraces such openness and honesty in order to connect better with her fans.

It is no surprise then that she is incredibly successful, with over 475K subscribers and a book to her name.

Read our interview with Hannah below:

You talk about difficult and taboo subjects like sex, periods and the pill. Is it ever hard to talk about such issues and be so open?

I personally don’t find it very hard because I love talking about these topics. The difficulty I find is making sure my language is inclusive as possible and I handle the serious topics sensitively.

Do you think conversations about these topics are happening enough in society and in our schools?

I think conversations are happening but not often in the best way i.e. often in a negative, shaming kind of way. I’m interested to see how this changes with relationships and sex education becoming compulsory in schools from September 2019.

Why do you think YouTube is the right place to talk about such issues and break the stigma around them?

There is great potential on YouTube in terms of the number of people you can reach. I also think YouTube is a great place to be having these conversations because watching videos is often a solo experience. So, if talking about sex or other taboo topics is something you don’t feel like you can do with people in your life you can privately watch videos on YouTube that’ll maybe answer any questions you were having or things you were worried about.

What do you wish you had known about sex when you were younger? What advice would you give to your younger viewers?

I wish I had known that sex can be funny and it can be messy (figuratively and literally!) And the advice I would give is pee after sex!

You’ve recently been recovering from a stoma surgery. How has it been? What has the response from fans been like?

It’s been very difficult and very slow. The response from my audience has been amazing. Talking through everything that’s happened to me online is a really useful part of my healing process so I’m grateful that everyone has been so kind and supportive.

You previously discussed some deeply personal topics in ‘The Hormone Diaries’, such as coming off the pill, trying a menstrual cup and getting the coil. Did you ever struggle to be so honest about such topics?

Not really haha! Like I said, I really enjoy talking about these things and the episode of The Hormone Diaries of me trying a menstrual cup for the first time and filming my reaction is one of the funniest videos I think I’ve ever made! I love watching it back, it makes me laugh so much!

Have you ever regretted sharing something on your channel?

Not yet!

How has your YouTube channel impacted your life?

I mean, it completely changed my life. This is my career now and I love it. I’m a published author because of my YouTube channel and get to work for myself and be my own boss. I fell into this completely by accident and it’s now become a big part of my life.

What is the best and worst part of creating such personal content on YouTube?

The best part is seeing the impact it has on other people. The fact that I am so open about my personal journey often gives people permission to talk about the things affecting them in their lives, give them confidence or finally find someone who is going through a similar thing to them and they can relate.

It’s hard to say what the worst part is but maybe the fact that I find it hard to switch off and the line of what I want to share and keep private is ever-changing.

What is the most important lesson you have learnt from your time as a YouTuber?

This is going to sound really dull but time management! I’ve always been a naturally organised person but boy oh boy does working for yourself force you to really take control and responsibility for how you spend your time.

Do you have anything coming up in the future which you wish to share with fans?

At the moment I’m focusing on my health and recovering but I will be writing a second book which I’m very excited about and for fans of mine who are into video games I’m going to start streaming soon and I can’t wait! 

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