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Banning bottomless drinks won't get to the bottom of sugar intake

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Pizza Hut and TGI Friday's have decided to remove bottomless drinks from their restaurants by March next year amid fears that they drive sugar intake.

It's no secret that fizzy drinks have a lot of sugar in them, and I respect that these restaurants are trying to look after their customer's health, but I don't think banning bottomless drinks is the answer. 

This ban is mainly aimed at children, but a child can only drink as many fizzy drinks as their parents allow them. I also don't blame the parents for taking this option for their child either, as it should save them money depending on how many they get and at the end of the day it makes their child happy, which is the main priority. 

If these restaurants were truly concerned about customer's sugar intake, they should provide alternatives rather than banning them altogether.

One way they could do this is offering a non-sugar option; this could be in the form of Coke Zero or Sprite Zero or any other fizzy drink that has no sugar in it. I don't know whether these restaurants would be allowed to sell these drinks but if they're available then they should definitely be an option. 

They should also consider warning customers how much sugar there is in one glass of fizzy drink, which may put off parents buying them for their children or other customers in general. 

Pizza Hut and TGI Friday's advertise themselves as family-friendly restaurants and I believe that the bottomless drinks offer is incorporated in this. Others may not have experienced this, but there is joy when getting a round of bottomless drinks for your family, as you each have that smitten look on your face when you know that you can finish your drink without having to pay for a new one.

I don't think the amount of sugar intake from bottomless drinks should be the main health concern for these restaurants anyway.

I've been to both these places and although the food is absolutely delicious in my opinion, I've noticed that the calorie intake from the majority of their dishes is high. These restaurants don't offer many healthier alternatives compared to the dishes they advertise the most, which are typically the highest in calories, so they should focus on advertising healthier options or simply make their dishes less calorific.

From a business perspective, the ban doesn't make sense.

I'd imagine that these restaurants would be making a profit from selling bottomless drinks as they probably get large bulks of these drinks for a cheap price, and so can afford to sell them bottomless for a set fee. Also, bottomless drinks are a unique-selling-point for these restaurants, so if they get rid of them, what makes them different from other restaurants? Surely it would be harder to compete.

As mentioned previously, I respect that these restaurants are looking out for their customer's health, but as sad as it sounds, surely they should be prioritising business?

For the older admirers of bottomless drinks, the majority of them are aware of roughly how much sugar is in a fizzy drink and how healthy or unhealthy their diet is, so shouldn't these restaurants just allow them to eat and drink whatever they offer?

It's okay for somebody to eat and drink certain foods and drinks if they are concerned about their health, but the last thing they need is to be too health-conscious, otherwise, it starts taking over their lives and they forget to treat themselves.

Body image isn't everything. I'm a strong believer that beauty lies within, so if you're concerned about sugar affecting your body image, don't be, because it shouldn't matter. Yes, too much sugar becomes a health concern but eating or drinking sugar in moderation shouldn't concern you, so have a bottomless drink every now and then before they disappear!

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