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No, UKIP are not back

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On the 24th June 2016, Nigel Farage had completed his political ambition. Leaving the EU was the one thing he'd entered politics to do. But the question in the head of every UKIP member must've been: "What the hell happens to us now?!"

Can you name another UKIP policy other than leaving the European Union? The only thing that comes to my mind is the Burqa ban due to Vitamin D. Which was the worst policy of the 2017 election, which is saying something.

They key was to make the party evolve and transform into something else. But since them UKIP has been crippled by in-fighting, Steven Woolfe being involved in an altercation in Strasbourg - UKIP can't even behave amongst themselves, imagine then negotiating for the nation.

Douglas Carswell has left the party. Diane James resigned as leader, just weeks after succeeding Farage. Then came, Paul Nuttall, who proved himself to be somewhat of a pathological liar. He apparently used to be a professional footballer, lost a close personal friend at Hillsborough and also in 2004, received a Ph.D. from a university which didn't exist until 2005.

His explanation for all of them is they were all made by other individuals. He had also in 2004, claimed citations from David Irving in a history paper which appeared to put blame on the Holocaust on the Jewish people themselves.

But this wasn't Nuttall's fault, his girlfriend provided the citations.

Having lost all reason to exist, UKIP seemingly decided to go out in style, Nuttall is an adult, he is responsible for the stuff going up in his name. A destruction in the local council and General Election followed and Nuttall, who always seemed out of place, was out the door.

The latest election - you'd think would be pivotal. The chance to bring some sanity and progress back to party ranks.

Well, the way in which it was conducted, and the end result show nothing to suggest that.

The front-runner was former Labour Party candidate Anne Marie Waters - the Irish born candidate is the director of Sharia Watch and formed Pegida UK with former EDL chief Tommy Robinson and Paul Weston who is a member of Liberty GB, an ultranationalist fringe group.

With UKIP being accused of racism and extremism, the fact that someone like her could win - would've spelled disaster for the party. Several senior UKIP members resigned over the fact she was able to stand and Nigel Farage even declared UKIP would be "finished" if she won. 

She lost to Henry Bolton, a former Liberal Democrat serviceman beat Waters. Bolton was backed by Nigel Farage.

That didn't go down to well with Waters and her supporters. 

Claims of a conspiracy began widely circulating. Rather than work out why she lost, Waters and her supporters started playing the blame game. Westminster was out to get her. A massive conspiracy, nothing to do with the fact that Waters has political views that any sane, reasonable person would be horrified by. 

She has ran a campaign on fear. Fear of Muslims and foreigners and like the fear campaigns of Remain, Clinton and May she got what she deserved.

But the divisions in the party are still clear. Banks has removed his money. There's no hope, Bolton will lose a significant amount of support from UKIP members who backed Waters and there's still the issue of what UKIP stand for.

UKIP's policies have grown increasingly authoritarian. At a time when the Conservatives - traditionally the most libertarian of Britain's political parties are edging further away from that - that's a big trick that has been missed.

There's a gap in British politics, just left-of-centre- where Blair used to be. There's a gap between the Lib Dems and Corbyn's Labour and it needs to be filled. UKIP are looking for a new vision, why not a slow gravitation towards the point in the spectrum, where there is a gap?

Sadly, the prevalence of attitudes such as Waters won't allow that. Far too ideological and too mistrusting of anyone else. This is a problem that is prevalent in all parties at the moment, but UKIP don't have the level of support or financial backing to make up for it.

Whether you like it or not, in modern politics, personality is just as important as ideas, but UKIP became too reliant on the personality of Nigel Farage. Farage seems to be content out of UKIP life, his ambition is completed. His show on LBC seems to be doing well, so he's not coming back.

Bolton has a task that is just about impossible. Re-inviting and uniting UKIP. Even if he's reunited them, their reputation of being clowns and morons won't help gain new followers. UKIP are finished.

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