Media Partners | Contributors | Advertise | Contact | Log in | Tuesday 23 April 2019
182,502 SUBSCRIBERS

Eaten by Lions review: A comedic tale of two brothers

RATE THIS ARTICLE

Share This Article:

Directed by Jason Wingard, Eaten by Lions is a buddy comedy with an all-star cast, ultimately about the importance of family.

 

Image Credit: AR PR: Andy Hollingworth Archive

Eaten by Lions tells the heart-warming story of half-brothers Omar (played by Antonio Aakeel) and Pete (played by Jack Carroll), who were raised by their grandmother after their parents were tragically killed by lions in a bizarre accident. After the recent death of their beloved gran, the now teenage brothers embark on a grand adventure to track down Omar’s biological father.

 

The story is fashioned through a surprisingly creative narrative, as the audience are able to see it unfold through snapshots of Omar’s scrapbook. Our story begins as the book turns a new chapter after the recent death of Omar’s grandmother. As Omar goes through her old home, where the two boys have grown up, we see her influence on them both as children and in a present-day setting as nearly grown young men.

 

Credit ought to be given to the directors and writers for handling both comedy and very heavy, sometimes intense subject matter respectfully in every level. The story does not shy away from heavy, hot-button issues such as death, loss, race, disabilities and LGBTQ topics - rather it embraces them, bringing light and levity to topics that can often be quite emotional. The story’s attempt to poke fun and laugh through the pain and struggle can at times be a little awkward, but more often than not is readily welcomed. The dialogue is sharp, written to a witty perfection and the ensemble cast really shines with the material.

 

Image Credit: AR PR: Andy Hollingworth Archive

The film also makes a bold choice, starting a discussion about race and discrimination at the beginning of the story, allowing us to see just how out of place Omar feels in a world dominated by people who do not understand or trust him due to the colour of his skin. He is an Indian man who always knew he was different, and despite the love and acceptance shown to him by Pete and his Gran, Omar is still treated with suspicion by the rest of the world.

 

The two brothers meet a colourful cast of characters during their journey, and through a series of mishaps - including interrupting the family engagement celebration - they do indeed meet Omar’s biological father. And while in any other movie this would be a sappy, heartfelt and sweet moment between a long lost father and son, this comedy brings things into a direction you wouldn’t quite expect.

As the second son of a prominently wealthy Indian family, Asim Chaudhry is one of the standouts of the film in his role as Irfan, a spoiled man-child who at first flat out refuses to accept Omar as his son, much to the disappointment of Omar who has dreamed of meeting him for years.

 

Image Credit: AR PR: Andy Hollingworth Archive

The story is familiar, and the adventure, road-trip buddy comedy feel of it is as well-loved as your favourite coat. Despite the familiar format, this film manages to bring something new and different to the table, showcasing a normal Indian family without succumbing to some of the cliched stereotypes. The Choudray family represents a truly contemporary example of modern multicultural Britain that is particularly refreshing to see.

 

Whilst Eaten by Lions boasts an incredibly talented ensemble cast, the film is ultimately not a story focusing on father and son, but rather the love story between two brothers. It teaches us to follow the example of Pete and Omar, who love and support each other as only brothers can. 

Image Credit: AR PR: Andy Hollingworth Archive

Eaten by Lions will be released in UK Cinemas 29th March 2019.




CONTRIBUTOR OF THE MONTH
© 2019 TheNationalStudent.com is a website of BigChoice Group Limited | 201 Borough High Street, London, SE1 1JA | registered in England No 6842641 VAT # 971692974